homeschooling · The-Year-Of-Quality · Writing

Homeschool Book Review: Wordly Wise 3000

My older son is a certifiable bibliophile. He reads. And reads. And reads. He likes to read books 3 times. The first time is to experience the story. The second time is to pick up on anything he may have overlooked in his desire to find out what happens next. The third time is to solidify any questions and take a more critical look at the work.

At 11, yes, he’s a serious reader; but how do I build on it?

{Links to my Amazon Affiliate account – if you choose to purchase through my link, it provides a small amount of money for us to augment our homeschool studies – Thank you!}

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Enter Vocabulary study.

He’s also considering a future as an editor. He’s very good at it, finding typos and other overlooked verbiage issues. As a homeschooling parent, I want him to be exposed to many different kinds of language and content. We started at grade level and he was bored. Flying through the content, or not wanting to plod along through the too easy — so we moved up to ninth {9th} grade. While it isn’t terribly challenging for him, there are enough new words {even to me!} that we chose to stick with this grade for now.

What I like about this study is that it not only defines the words, but gives the opportunity to use the words in sentences, as well as in context reading.

You’ll notice that I don’t have any grades lower than 4 listed. Why? It’s not that Wordly Wise doesn’t sell books below this grade level, but I’d be remiss if I encouraged anyone to purchase these for children younger than 9 or 10. In our house, we don’t focus on tons of workbooks before 3rd or 4th grade — and even then, we didn’t do spelling or vocabulary studies per se. To be honest, this is our first year of doing *real* spelling/vocabulary.

Why?

We read. We read a lot. We get much of our new vocabulary through reading and learn spellings and meanings directly from our literature. However, my older son wanted to focus on this, so we did. My younger son liked the idea of taking weekly tests {not in the books, but what we do for fun} and now also has a vocabulary book of his own.

How much do we do?

Well, we aim for a chapter per week, but sometimes we get busy and get the work completed in 2 weeks. Some weeks he wants to knock out the lists he finds too easy and do more than one chapter per week {with the two tests}. It’s only happened a few times, but he enjoys it when he does – it makes him feel like he’s getting {even further} ahead of the curve.

So that’s our vocabulary study. It’s what working for us now that my boys love to do!

How are you building your vocabulary?

@Bikurgurl_watermark

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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